Boat weight

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Boat weight

Postby cajunsnowchaser » Wed Dec 17, 2014 10:43 pm

Hello all im new here and getting ready to build two duckhunters this summer. Both boats will be run with a trolling motor only. One boat will be full size one a mini. My question is if i use okoume ply smaller then what the plans call for how light do yall belive i can bring the boat in.
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Re: Boat weight

Postby beekeeper » Fri Dec 19, 2014 12:43 am

May I ask, how will you use the boats, and why do you need them lighter?

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Re: Boat weight

Postby cajunsnowchaser » Fri Dec 19, 2014 2:45 am

They will be used only for duck hunting and i want to keep them light to make it vetter run with a trolling motor and the smaller one to be taken in and out of the back of my truck bed the larger on i will have a trailer for it.
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Re: Boat weight

Postby beekeeper » Mon Dec 22, 2014 3:09 am

I have not built a duckhunter, so these ideas are food for thought only. They may be only worth what you pay for them.
For the full size trailered boat, you might want to consider building it to specs if there is any possibility you or someone else would want to use a power motor ever. Troll motors are used to power some very large and heavy fishing boats, so making your boat lighter may not be necessary. If you choose to modify it (lighter build) it may be unsafe if you add an engine later. If I built it for troll motor only I would build it so an engine could not be mounted, to prevent it from ever being overpowered.
Gator designs allow building without epoxy/fiberglass, a significant reduction in weight, and would not be needed for a troll motor only boat
Using a light weight species of wood for the framing and attention to details can save weight.
A shorter boat can feel lighter (handier) than a longer one that weighs the same or less.
Smaller decks, tumblehome panels, etc. can add up to weight savings.
Not sure how much portability you need, nor how well the design is adaptable, but if the boat could be paddled easily you would save about 100 lbs., in motor and battery. Another boat design may work better and be easier to build than changing the duckhunter (a pirogue, or decked canoe).
Hope a duckhunter builder will answer your questions soon. I am anxious to see how your builds go.
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Re: Boat weight

Postby cajunsnowchaser » Mon Dec 22, 2014 3:26 am

Thanks for all the good info bee. And lots of food for thought but trolling motor only i will never get rid of the boats. Anouther reason i want to build a full size duckhunter as light as poissable is i hunt marsh lakes and mud flats and may need to push it out sometimes and a full size boat will be good for when there is two of us hunting. As far as epoxy and glass i cant see ply lasting long with just paint in a saltwater marsh. I also plan on building a mini dh. Both boats will have the rocker removed for added stability and weight carring abilites. Would use a canoe or piroge but to many duck commander want to bes running around in the channels and lakes with surface drives for those small craft. I work construction offshore so i have a good understanding of how stressea are put on structers and im thinking with only using a trolling motor and push pole i can safely bring the weight down by using smaller thickness of ply and poxy and glass as well as cutting holes in the bulkheads and side brases. Lot to read but please chim in with thoughts are
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Re: Boat weight

Postby beekeeper » Tue Dec 23, 2014 3:21 am

I'm a chiming.
Consider epoxy graphite coating for the bottom. It will be very slippery and will act as a sacrificial surface when dragging the boat.
Anything (fiberglass) added to a boat will increase its strength, but the trade off is added weight. Only you can decide how strong is strong enough and how much weight you are willing to put up with. "My" experiences indicate the added strength of fiberglass is not needed for a well constructed "chine log" designed boat. The added weight is significant. I have not found fiberglass to be very scuff or gouge resistant. It might resist punctures better, but is this an issue for a troll motor powered boat, and where you boat. Kevlar cloth on the bottom would probably be a worth while consideration. Two part epoxy garage floor paint has worked well for me. It is a very hard and has a smooth finish.
Fiber glassing over wood will not guarantee the wood will not rot. Look at all the "fiberglass boats" with rotten transoms and stringers. The wood species used in marine plywood are not rated very rot resistant. It's advantages is the lack of voids (allows in, and traps moisture) and water proof glue. Lack of maintenance and improper storage are probably the biggest cause of boats rotting.
What are the dimensions of the mini?
Small outboard motor's weight vs. troll motor and batteries, weight?
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Re: Boat weight

Postby cajunsnowchaser » Tue Dec 23, 2014 3:53 am

More good food for thought bee thank you. The mini is going to be around 11 or 12 foot havent set down on a exact length yet and as for as motor weight my trolling motor and battery weight very much less then a gas tank and motor i would need to push it and then i can only use the gas motor in the channels and lakes once i get on the marsh i cant use it anymore do to refuge rules.
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Re: Boat weight

Postby NCSUDucker » Tue Dec 23, 2014 10:55 pm

Some good info from bee. I will add fiberglass and epoxy doesn't add as much as you think. The glass weight is per square yard and the epoxy it takes to wet it out doesn't add as much as one might think. With 6 oz glass and epoxy, you are probably looking at around 12 ounces or so per square yard. So with the DH, probably in the 20-30 lb range. The added benefits and protection are well worth the added weight IMHO. Again the life of the boat will reall depend on hows shes stored. You're on the right track for reducing weight. Just shave it where you can via cut outs and smaller dimension ply/lumber.

Brad
Toller Boatworks or become a fan of Toller Boatworks on facebook
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Re: Boat weight

Postby cajunsnowchaser » Wed Dec 24, 2014 3:16 am

Thanks and my hat off to bee and you NCSU. Good info from both of yall and thanks for the info on the epoxy and glass. One quick question on the glass and epoxy. What would be your thoughts on a lighter glass being im only using a trolling motor are should i roll with the six onglass.
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Re: Boat weight

Postby beekeeper » Wed Dec 24, 2014 3:40 am

I hope my "food for thought" postings have not misled. My building experiences and perspectives are related to paddle boats. I felt comfortable posting because these two boats will be troll motor powered only. I would consider the goals and design features, at least for the mini, to be close to those of a paddle craft.
Every design change has its trade offs. Only the builder can decide what is right and/or worth while for them. For Brad adding 20-30 lbs. of glass to a DH is worth while and a small increase. Adding 10-20 lbs. to the weight of my pirogue would be a significant increase of 10% to 30% in weight. Cost is also increased. Meaningful weight reduction is a worthy but difficult task. Attention to details, material choices, and carful planning are needed. Sometimes, depending on your goals and priorities, a different design may be needed. Not saying the DH is the wrong boat. Just saying if the goal is a 50 lb. load in the truck by myself boat, another design may work better.
If you decide to fiberglass the plywood consider eliminating the chine logs and use stich and glue construction. Also panels constructed out of wood strips and fiberglass can offer a weight savings over plywood. Brad should know if these types of construction would work for your builds.

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